How much does Malawi cost?

Posted on November 20, 2019 by - Interesting Reads

I will confess that this small article (one of a series written about Safari Costs by African Country) is mostly written with South Africans in mind.

Many people naturally may assume that Malawi – because it is a poor country – must be an inexpensive country to visit on holiday. Unfortunately this is far from the truth.

Very broadly speaking, 7 nights in Malawi at a beach will cost the same as 7 nights in a Mauritius beach resort.

As Malawi – along with nearly all African countries – has taken the approach of building a low density, high profit margin tourism industry. Plus, if you stay at a mix of Safari & Beach lodges then it will be more per night. See our chart below.

Lake Malawi Resorts - Malawi safari cost & price

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Tanzania safari photo blog by Kate

Posted on September 4, 2019 by - African Travel Tips, Interesting Reads

Back in May, I had the good fortune of going on another Tanzania photographic safari in the northern regions. This time I was visiting outside of the peak season so I was keen to see how the safari experience differed. I was also going to Lake Natron, an area I had not seen before.

This is not a trip report where I discuss the relative merits of one safari camp over the other. It is a celebration of the wildlife of northern Tanzania. As I am not a very good photographer, I think it shows you just how good the sightings are – that even I was able to get some decent shots. (Note to self – don’t take so many portrait shots which cannot be displayed in a blog post!)

I will mention lodges and camps that I really enjoyed in passing. But I will also link you to our longer profile and my 1st-hand review – if you want more info.

Serengeti leopard with prey

 

Style of Safari

Our trip was primarily a road trip – but of the ideal tupe. We drove in, but flew out – a great way to do a Tanzania photographic safari.

This is my preferred style of safari – over a fly-in safari – as you get to see how the various regions relate to each other. You see the general countryside and not just the game reserves. It also has the added advantage of being a little less expensive, even for 2 people. And you have a private guide who gets to know you and what you are interested in. If you are four people or a family party, the differential is even greater.

Plus the airstrips are not necessarily close to all the camps. So even on a fly-in safari, there is a fair amount of driving. And of course the flying days are naturally somewhat disjointed. So we recommend a fly-in safari when you are very tight on time and only want to see the top highlights. But if you have more time to spend, we recommend a drive-in safari.

Serenegti lion in long grass

Our vehicle was a classic East African safari vehicle – a modified land cruiser with 6 “window” seats, a pop-up roof for taking photos and a refrigerated cooler box in between the back seats for cold water on tap.

Being used to the more open style of Southern African safari vehicles, the enclosed vehicle took some getting used to. The pop-up roof sides provide a natural base for your camera which is great. But slightly limited space up there does tend to get monopolised by the keener photographers.

Useful Blog Post: Differences between an East African and Southern Africa Safari

Overnight near Arusha

Many times, you will need to overnight in or near Arusha at either the start or the end of your safari. This is no bad thing as you can recover from the overnight flight and get a good nights’ sleep prior to your early mornings on safari.

There’s a range of places to stay to suit every budget. Indeed as it is not an important night, this is where you can economize if your need to. We did not! We stayed at the smartest place, Arusha Coffee Lodge.

See our website profile of Arusha Coffee Lodge

I enjoyed Arusha Coffee Lodge with the spacious and comfortable rooms, the coffee plantation all around, the good food and the coffee tour with their engaging and very enthusiastic guide. They had set up a series of workshops in the grounds where artisans with disabilities could ply their trade. They worked with designers so that the hand-crafted goods, for sale in the upmarket shop there, were definitely a cut above the average safari craft. Win-win all round! So a great soft landing to our Tanzania photographic safari!

 

Tarangire National Park

Our first safari stop was Tarangire National Park, 2 hours’ drive from Arusha. I was very pleasantly surprised by Tarangire. I consider this park worth a visit at any time of year, even in the green season. In mid-May I had not expected to see so much.  But we saw a lot, all within a short distance of the park gates. Plus because it was the green season, there were very few vehicles and so it felt natural and unhurried. We could stay as long as we liked at a sighting.

Of course we saw lots of elephants. However we were probably only seeing 10-20% of normal elephant sightings as they head to upland areas of Tarangire eco-system at this time of year!  So goodness only knows what it is like in July and August!

Tarangire elephants

We didn’t see many zebra and wildebeest as they leave in the wet season as the grass is too tall for them. (That’s when they start their migration northwards to the Ngorongoro highlands and the southern Serengeti.) But we saw loads of them later in our trip. However in Tarangire there was still plenty of other game and excellent birding.

We always try to include at least one night here, ideally 2 nights. Then you can stay in the camps within the park itself (Olivers Camp, Little Olivers or Swala) and you can head further south in the park.

Tarangire crowned crane

If staying one night, there are many camps on the northern border such as Tarangire River Camp. Others lie between Tarangire and Lake Manyara (e.g. Chem Chem) so that you can visit both from one base.

See our website profile of Tarangire River Camp

Tarangire River Camp is a mid-range tented camp with a stunning cliff-top setting with vistas over the river to the park. I wasn’t crazy about this camp but the setting is a winner, especially if you take one of the river-side tents. The honeymoon suite, with spa bath and outdoor shower, is a little extra, if you feel like treating yourself.

Lake Natron

From here we headed north to Lake Natron. What a find for a Tanzania photographic safari! Lake Natron is an interesting combination of both awe-inspiring serenity and wilderness, and adventure. I know that many people are under time pressure and so it may not always be possible to include this area. But if you have time, especially if you like to be active, it is well worth a visit.

There is also a road which takes you from Lake Natron up the Rift valley escarpment and into the northern Serengeti National Park. This is perfect later in the season when the wildebeest migration is in the north of the Serengeti, as you avoid having to drive through the whole park to the north.

lake natron flamingos scenic

I loved this camp and its activities – but it is not for everyone as it is quite rustic. But I felt that they did a great job of getting the mix right between rusticity and traveller comfort.

See our website profile of Lake Natron Camp

At first glance, it looks extraordinary – a little like a series of army mess tents with the camouflage outer Bedouin tents. But this extra shade cover made a noticeable difference to the inner tent temperature, compared to other tents I have experienced in hot African months.

It was hot, but not unbearably so, and there are fans in the tents, right above the bed. (Apparently it is slightly cooler during the safari season (June to October).

I loved the natural swimming pool (even if I never did get used to the cichlid fish nibbling my feet). That was an inspired decision to create it and makes for a very pleasant afternoon of relaxation after a morning of walking.

Activities – great range of activities to suit most people, assuming that you are reasonably fit. This includes walks to the lakeshore to see the flamingos, walks to the hominin footprints and a range of scenic and adventurous walking excursions.

 

lake natron flamingos

 

Lake Manyara National Park

We didn’t stay overnight but enjoyed a game drive in the park. The park is not perhaps as good as it was (as the lake has largely silted up). Plus it is sufficiently close to the Ngorongoro area that you can stay there and yet easily enjoy a game drive in Lake Manyara.

 

Lake manyara birding

But Lake Manyara is a must for keen bird-watchers. For keen birders, we do recommend staying a night IN the park so that you can explore further south into the park and thus into the less busy areas.

Lake manyara birding

Ngorongoro Crater

We then headed to the Ngorongoro Crater area. A reserve which receives a mixed reception from some critics. On the one hand, you are likely to see a lot of wildlife. On the other hand, many people don’t like the crowds of vehicles which are typical of this ultra-popular reserve.

For me, I think it’s all about expectations. Expect to see plenty of other vehicles. Be amused at the human race lined up in a series of vehicles all trying to take the definitive picture of a distant black rhino. Enjoy the majesty of the natural phenomenon of this extinct volcanic crater which is now a wildlife refuge of note.

Ngorongoro crater elephant

And – above all – don’t see your Ngorongoro Crater visit as only about the crater. The Ngorongoro highlands are very scenic with an interesting mix of coffee plantations and rural Maasai villages.

Because of its central location, you can easily spend several days here and enjoy both the Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara and also have time to relax at your lodge and do activities there. Depending on the lodge, this could range from coffee plantation tours to horse-riding. Or from scenic hikes to the Olmoti or Empakai craters, to spending time in a Maasai village. You could even visit the Hadza (Bushmen) and Dakota people from here. So a stay of 3 even 4 nights would not go amiss.

Climate – The Ngorongoro Crater was noticeably the coolest place on our whole trip. It gets even cooler in July to October. So you will need to have warm gear for here if you feel the cold. There is much emphasis on fireplaces in the rooms and very little emphasis on swimming pools!

Ngorongoro crater warthog

Which Lodge to Choose?

Broadly speaking there are three main options:

If your focus is solely on the Ngorongoro Crater (and you are staying only 1 or 2 nights), then ideally you want to be as close as possible to the Crater. Your choices are somewhat limited to either the more modest options such as Serena or Sopa hotels, the decadent and over the top Ngorongoro Crater Lodge or the Neptune (strange name I know) lodge, which isn’t on the rim, but at the park gates.

See our website profile of Ngorongoro Crater Lodge and Neptune Ngorongoro Luxury Lodge

If you are using the Ngorongoro highlands as a base for a few days, then I would recommend using one of the country lodges which are 30 to 40 minutes’ drive away.

I liked many of these lodges – with the rather colonial Gibbs Farm being my favourite. However your choice probably will be down to a mix of personal taste, how much you want to spend and also, perhaps, the activities available at that lodge.

See our website profile of Gibbs Farm,  The Manor at Ngorongoro, and Plantation Lodge

If you are into wilderness, hiking and cultural experiences with the Maasai, there is a third choice which is to stay well into the Ngorongoro Highlands Conservation area, north-east of the Crater. Given the distance to get there I would recommend it for at least 2, if not 3 nights. I didn’t visit this time. But my colleague has so have a look at our website profile of The Highlands

Olduvai Gorge

After our rewarding morning game drive in the Crater, we headed north to the southern Serengeti. En route we broke our journey at the new museum at Olduvai Gorge. This re-imagined museum has been a long time coming. But finally the amazing treasures discovered by Richard Leakey and his team are being displayed to good effect. It is well worth a stop for at least an hour if you have time.

The Serengeti

Now we come to the Serengeti which was for me, as for so many, the crowning glory of the trip. And a must for a Tanzania photographic safari! We arrived late at the gates but were immediately treated to some fantastic sightings of a cheetah mother, on an attempted kill. And her cubs. And then a pride of lions on a high koppie a la Lion King. Then more lions on the move in search of supper. The light was fading too much for perfect photography. But it couldn’t have been a better start.

Serengeti cheetah
Free Insiders Guide to Migration Safaris in Tanzania
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Free Insiders Guide to Migration Safaris in Tanzania

We also saw massed packs of wildebeest on their gradual migration north. By late May they were firmly in the Seronera area of the central Serengeti and heading towards the western corridor. Later on in June and early July they would start heading up to northern Serengeti.

 

Serengeti wildebeest migration

Hot Air Ballooning

We had the amazing good fortune to experience a hot air balloon safari. It was awe-inspiring to be floating just above the Serengeti looking at the wildlife. In particular I was captivated by a pride of lions who looked up at these giant floating baskets with a quizzical air.

There was much angst that we didn’t manage to get the ‘perfect shot’ but it was surprisingly hard to get a clear shot as the balloon was moving much faster than we felt.

Lion whilst in a hot air balloon

This was THE highlight for many and its novel viewpoint is well worth the rather extravagant price tag. If you can afford it, do so. Just don’t ask your Tour Operator to itemise the cost!

Note on Getting Stuck

The height of the safari season is from July to October. That’s when the prices are highest and the crowds of people are the most.

We went in mid to late May which meant that though we saw other vehicles, I didn’t get the sense of overwhelming visitor numbers. But it is not long after the rains of March to early May and the ground is still wet. And so it is easy to get stuck.

We got stuck for several hours in the Moru Kopjes. We all tried valiantly with our guide to get us out. With much cautious gathering – as this is lion country – or stones and large branches to give some grip. But in the end, it took another vehicle from a nearby camp to pull us out. I have no pictures because when getting out of the vehicle at the start, I foolishly didn’t take the camera.

So probably mid-May may be a tad too early to visit that area (Moru Kopjes). I would say June would be a safer bet.

 

Big Cats Everywhere

The sheer quantity of big cat sightings in our short visit was remarkable. Including the interaction of predators with their prey. We witnessed a lioness taking down a wildebeest. Then immediately – within 15 minutes she was on the hunt again. It was fascinating to see how – once she crouched down – the long grass completely covered her. However this second time, they got wind of her and took off. Talk about a bonus shot on our Tanzania photographic safari!

Serengeti llion on hunt

We witnessed a truly epic journey of a leopard with a large puku making its way across the grasslands to the safety of a kopje (small hillock) where she would be able to hide the prey from the lions and hyena. She had to carry her heavy prey across approx 300 metres, pausing every few metres to catch her breath. It was truly a heroic task and we decided to stay to see if she made it. She did!

Note: We were the second vehicle at the sighting but because of the length of time it took her to reach the kopje, by the end there must have been 20 or so vehicles. It was an example of just how busy it can get later in the season.

Serengeti leopard with kill

Serengeti Lodges

We visited a number of lodges but my focus here is to show you how good the game-viewing was, even though it was no-where near peak season. But I particularly liked the following:

Asanje Mara and Serengeti Pioneer Camp

My colleague Mari visited:

Dunia Camp, Olakira Camp and Sayari Camp

 

Serengeti - lioness in long grass

Note: Just another example of how beautifully camouflaged the big cats are in the long Serengeti grasslands…

Stone Town

Finally we had to leave the Serengeti. It was hard to go but we did at least have a few days of relaxation in Zanzibar at Baraza. En route we visited Stone Town for the afternoon.

Stone Town received a mixed review from my fellow travellers so it is worth a brief note. It has some of the style and ambience of Marrakech. But it is poorer and it shows. The street markets are a mix of tourist trinkets but also everyday household items such as washing powder or shoes.  Yes the wooden doors are elaborately carved and beautiful, but the paint will be peeling on the walls and someone may be sitting on the doorstep selling wooden carvings.

Some people wanted it to be clean and pretty but it isn’t. It’s real and authentic. But I enjoyed it. I liked walking through the streets and seeing this juxtaposition of the beautiful and the ugly. I was interested to learn about the history of Zanzibar and in particular the importance of the slave trade.

In my opinion it is well worth a visit, at least for a few hours. Perhaps even an overnight stay depending on your arriving or departing flight schedules. But others may choose not to.

See our website profile of Park Hyatt Zanzibar

Free Guide to Tanzania Safaris
Check out our photo-rich Insiders Guide to Tanzania & share with family & family!
Free Guide to Tanzania Safaris

 

Zanzibar Resorts

After a stunning but tiring time travelling and visiting camps on the safari circuit, we arrived at the luxurious Baraza on the south-east coast of Zanzibar.

I didn’t take many photos at Baraza as I think it is utterly fair to say that it looks every bit as good as it seems in the photos. The swimming pool is THAT beautiful and the beach is THAT white. So if you want to know about it, read our profile and my reviews here:

Baraza Resort & Spa and Breezes Hotel & Spa

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No longer Cinderella – Introducing Zambezi National Park

Posted on May 31, 2019 by - Interesting Reads

Zambezi National Park

Over the last few years there has been an explosion of activity in this once sleepy backwater with a raft of new game lodges opening up.

For years the Zambezi National Park was considered the small, somewhat inconsequential step-sister, to the bigger and brasher Chobe National Park.

Chobe had the brand name. Chobe was in Botswana which is far better known than Zimbabwe. I’ll correct that. Far better known in positive terms – for safaris and not questionable leaders.

Chobe offered both land and water activities which is attractive to people wanting to have a varied safari experience. Chobe had safari lodges to suit all pockets (within a Botswana safari context). But over the years Chobe has almost become a victim of its own success.

Perhaps the ugly step-sister analogy is too unfair. But people have been starting to look elsewhere. Meanwhile there is no denying that some fairy godmother has turned the Zambezi National Park into a princess. And not just for one night!

Where is the Zambezi National Park?

The Zambezi National Park has a stunning location being between Victoria Falls and the border with Botswana (i.e. en route to the Chobe).

It also borders a river. But this time it’s the mighty Zambezi River (which the smaller Chobe River runs into). It is a sizeable park, being 55,000ha. (To put that into perspective, the Sabi Sands is only 62,000ha). Although it is not as vast as Chobe because of the road network, most Chobe visitors stay in a much smaller area close to the river anyway.

Wildlife in the Zambezi National Park

And the wildlife is surprisingly good for such a lesser-known park. Although it may not boast as much wildlife diversity, the beauty of being in this park is the ability to get close to game sightings. You are likely to spot buffalo, elephant, lion, and leopard. And of course other wildlife such as kudu, impala, sable, eland, warthog, and zebra.

And let’s not forget the advantage that the mighty Zambezi River brings – you’ll catch a glimpse of crocodile, waterbuck, and many pods of hippo when game viewing close to the banks of the river.

 

Advantages of Zambezi National Park

Close to Victoria Falls

Typically it is only 45 to 90 minutes from Victoria Falls to most lodges in the Zambezi National Park. This means that you can visit the Falls from your lodge. This is usually offered as an included activity, especially if you stay for 3 nights. Or you can spend 1 night at the Falls and then continue here for your safari experience, without losing a precious vacation day to travel.

Much Quieter

It is much quieter compared to the Chobe National Park where you are jostling for sightings with loads of other vehicles. And it is more peaceful than the busy town of Victoria Falls. Here the constant hum of helicopters flying over the Falls can be heard.

Bush Walks and Night Drives

Bush walks are a wonderful way to experience the bush on a whole new level. You won’t just discover the tracks and signs of larger wildlife, but will also learn about smaller creatures, trees and plants… and all with your senses (sight, smell, taste, sound and touch)!

And this park also allows for night drives, an activity that is not on offer in all national parks. This is the perfect way to get a glimpse of nocturnal animals (like the elusive leopard, genet, porcupine, honey badger and giant eagle owl). The big cats tend to be more active at night and you may find yourself following lions on the hunt.

Ultra-luxurious Lodges

Chobe has no ultra-luxurious lodges, because it is a national park and thus you cannot describe it as exclusive. But that’s not the case for the Zambezi where there are several upmarket and uber-deluxe lodges to choose from.

Canoeing

If you like to be active, you’ll enjoy the fact that many of the lodges offer canoeing on the Zambezi River, with its gentle, but nevertheless, exhilarating rapids.

Easy to combine with the Okavango Delta

As the park lies on the route between Victoria Falls and Kasane Airport (for flights into the Okavango), it’s easy to include in an itinerary.

Where to stay in Zambezi National Park (in order of distance from Victoria Falls)

 

Old Drift Lodge

This is a stunning new lodge with 12 rooms on the banks of the river. Old Drift (and Victoria Falls River Lodge) lie close to the town and so there would be no need to split your stay. Thus its fair to say that you can have the best of all worlds. But its also fair to say you won’t have that true sense of wilderness either.

Cedarberg Offer:4 night offer includes 3 nights at Imbabala and a night at either Elephant Camp or Old Drift Lodge. Park fees are extra but we usually include them in our quotes.

Old Drift Lodge river setting

 

Victoria Falls River Lodge

Slightly more romantic in feel to Old Drift with private plunge pools. Plus there’s the option to push the boat out, literally and metaphorically, by heading out to stay at one of their ultra-romantic Island Treehouse suites on a private island

 

Mpila Jena

This is the newest kid on the block, but probably the swankiest certainly in terms of price. We haven’t seen it yet so cannot comment too fully but a perfect accompaniment to Zarafa Lodge or Chief’s Camp.

 

Chundu Island Camp

Now we are starting to get away from it all. Chundu Island, as it name indicates, is on its own private island in the Zambezi River. From now on we’d recommend either staying 3 nights or combining with a night at the Falls themselves. Perfect for romantics!

 

Zambezi Sands River Camp

All these lodges have stunning settings but this is one of my personal favourites. There is a section of rapids close by so you see both the languorous side of the river and its more dramatic side. Plus the guys here like to get their clients out and about so they encourage bush walks and canoeing as well as game drives and boat cruises.

Cedarberg Offer: 3 for 2 in Green Season, 4 for 2 in December and January!

See in Action: Zimbabwe Safari Offer with Imvelo

 

 

Matetsi Victoria Falls

Until Mpila Jena came along, Matetsi was the queen of the river and to be frank, it may still be! With a stunning river setting in its own private concession of 55,000ha, you are guaranteed a superb wilderness and game-viewing experience. Top that with contemporary 120sqm suites each with its own pool and expansive deck overlooking said river, and Matetsi is hard to beat if you are looking for a top-end lodge.

Tip: If you are NOT staying 3 nights here, I would advise a night near town perhaps at the Stanley & Livingstone or Elephant Camp, as it is a solid 90 minute drive away.

Cedarberg Offer: Honeymooners – Stay 2 nights and one spouse pays only 50% (other spouse pays full rate)

Matetsi Victoria Falls lap pool

 

Imbabala Zambezi River Lodge

Almost at the border with Botswana, comes the most modest of the lodges, Imbabala Zambezi River Lodge. This very well priced lodge compares in price to the much larger Chobe bush hotels. But here you have a proper bush experience and personal attention with comfortable but modest rooms. As with Matetsi, it is best combined with a one night stay at Victoria Falls, though our 3 night offer includes a visit to the Falls (see below).

Imbabala makes the most of its setting by also offering a day visit to Chobe as well if you wish.

Cedarberg Offer: Our 3 night offer includes a visit to Chobe National park as well as a visit to Victoria Falls as part of either an arrival or departure transfer-tour.

 

Imbabala Zambezi Safari Lodge hammock
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